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Posts from the ‘Cinematheque’ Category

Cinematheque presents CIRCUMSTANCE

Cinematheque Fall 2013

Surveillance series

Opening film

CIRCUMSTANCE

Date: 9/4/13 Location: 169 Crawford Hall Time: 6 P.M

The film will be presented by Kelsey Cameron, 2nd year Film Studies Ph.D.

A note on the film: Winner of the 2011 Sundance Film Festival Audience Award, Circumstance (2011) is a provocative coming-of-age story that cracks open the hidden, underground world of Iranian youth culture filled with sex, drugs and defiance. From newcomer Maryam Keshavarz, this suspenseful tale of love and defiance unfolds as a wealthy family struggles to contain their teenage daughter’s growing sexual rebellion and her brother’s dangerous obsession. Issues of surveillance saturate the film, from the narrative centrality of the security camera to the police intervention that nearly shut down its filming. (From Amazon.com)

Cinematheque Presents: 16mm Shorts & “I’m a Cyborg, But That’s OK” (2006)

This Friday 4/12 at 6:30PM in David Lawrence 207 join us for a very special Film Studies Cinematheque 16mm presentation and screening as part of our Food & Feast series.

We will begin the evening with two 16mm shorts, “Automania 2000″ and “Dreams of Rarebit Fiend,” selected from Pitt’s own 16mm collection. This is a rare and fun opportunity to see selections from this collection. Veronica Fitzpatrick (PhD student English/ Film Studies) will present the 2006 film by Park Chan-wook, “I’m a Cyborg, but That’s OK.” Discussion to follow.

About “Cyborg”: Placed in a psych ward for believing she’s a robot, troubled Young-goon forsakes food and attempts instead to charge her body with electronic devices. As her health deteriorates, another eccentric patient tries to inspire her to start eating again.

Join us for Free Pizza!

Find PITT cinematheque on Facebook @
The Cinematheque (Pitt Film & Media Studies)

Questions? Contact Katie Bird (kbird4@gmail.com) or Jordan Schonig (jos120@pitt.edu).

Cinematheque presents “Nenette and Boni” (1996) – Claire Denis

This Friday 3/22 at 6:00PM in CL G8 is the fourth Film Studies Cinematheque screening of the semester as part of our Food & Feast series.

Jeff Heinzl (PhD Film Studies) will present the 1996 film by Claire Denis “Nenette and Boni”. Discussion to follow

About “Nenette and Boni”: A young man bonds with a troubled teen in this coming-of-age drama from director Claire Denis. When 14-year-old Nenette (Alice Houri) shows up at Boni’s (Gregoire Colin) doorstep, he isn’t sure what to do. Boni, who has a powerful obsession with the local baker’s wife (Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi), reluctantly takes Nenette in.

Find PITT cinematheque on Facebook @
The Cinematheque (Pitt Film & Media Studies)

Questions? Contact Katie Bird (kbird4@gmail.com) or Jordan Schonig (jos120@pitt.edu)

Cinematheque presents “Lemon Tree” (Etz Limon) – 2008

“Lemon Tree” (Etz Limon)

Friday 2/1, 5:00 PM. Cathedral of Learning, G8. Free Pizza!

Kuhu Tanvir (PhD student in English/Film) will present Eran Riklis’s 2008 film Lemon Tree (Etz Limon). Discussion to follow.

Lemon Tree (original title Etz Limon) is a 2008 Israeli film directed by Eran Riklis. It is the story of Salma Zidane, a Palestinian woman who’s ancestral farm becomes a point of contention after the Israeli defense minister moves in next door. The film follows Salma’s legal battle to save her land that is her only remaining connection to her family. Lemon Tree enters the volatile and nearly impossible political turmoil of the conflicted region of Israel and Palestine, telling a story that weaves in the political and the personal almost effortlessly. In an interview, Riklis said of his decision to use lemons as the binding motif of the film, “I didn’t want olive tress which seemed to be too symbolic and over used as an image. Lemons gave me freshness, bitterness, sweetness, a great color and overall a nice metaphor without being too metaphoric..”

Find PITT cinematheque on Facebook @ The Cinematheque (Pitt Film & Media Studies)
Questions? Contact Katie Bird (kbird4@gmail.com) or Jordan Schonig (jos120@pitt.edu)

Cinematheque presents “Daisies”(Sedmikrásky) – 1966

Daisies (Sedmikrásky) – 1966

Friday 1/18, 5:00 PM. Cathedral of Learning G8

Jordan Schonig (PhD student in English/Film) and Katie Bird (PhD student in English/Film) will co-present Věra Chytilová’s 1966 film Daisies (Sedmikrásky). discussion to follow.

About “Daisies” from Netflix: In this landmark, Czech new wave film, two young women (Jitka Cerhová and Ivana Karbanová) see a self-indulgent world where traditional values are meaningless and opt to forgo any pretense of standards. Donning matching outfits and penciling on raccoon-eye makeup, they embark on a series of freewheeling adventures — including staged dinner dates with old men and destroying a banquet hall — all enhanced by Jaroslav Kucera’s creative camera work

Find PITT cinematheque on Facebook @ The Cinematheque (Pitt Film & Media Studies) Questions? Contact Katie Bird (kbird4@gmail.com) or Jordan Schonig (jos120@pitt.edu)

Cinematheque: ‘Amélie’ (2001)

This Wednesday, 4/11, at 6:30 pm in Crawford 169 is the seventh and final Cinematheque screening of the semester. Lauren Russell (M.F.A. student, poetry) will present Amélie (2001), the fifth in our ‘Anthropomorphism‘ series. About ‘Amélie’ (from ‘Netflix’): When impish gamine Amélie (Audrey Tautou), who lives alone, finds a long-hidden trove of toys behind a baseboard in her apartment, she’s inspired to repatriate the items, an impulse of generosity that sparks more benevolent acts. A celebration of life and love, French director Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Oscar-nominated charmer stresses the importance of small wonders that surround us, if only we paused to look. How to get to Crawford Hall from the Cathedral of Learning: Exit the Cathedral of Learning towards Fifth Ave. Take a right on Fifth Ave. Turn left on Tennyson Ave. (between Alumni Hall and Clapp Hall). Pass Clapp Hall and Langley Hall on your right. The building immediately after Langley Hall (and also on your right) is Crawford Hall. P.S. Free pizza!

Cinematheque: ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ (1988)

This Wednesday, 3/28, at 6:30 pm in Crawford 169 is the sixth Cinematheque screening of the semester.

Jess FitzPatrick (Ph.D. student, literature) will present Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), the fifth in our ‘Anthropomorphism‘ series.

About ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ (from ‘Netflix’):

Director Robert Zemeckis seamlessly mixes live action with animation wizardry in this cinematic groundbreaker featuring Bob Hoskins as gruff gumshoe Eddie Valiant, who agrees to take the case of Roger Rabbit, a zany cartoon star framed for murder. But when blackmail and adultery come into play, Eddie discovers that his investigation is hardly kid stuff.

How to get to Crawford Hall from the Cathedral of Learning:

Exit the Cathedral of Learning towards Fifth Ave. Take a right on Fifth Ave. Turn left on Tennyson Ave. (between Alumni Hall and Clapp Hall). Pass Clapp Hall and Langley Hall on your right. The building immediately after Langley Hall (and also on your right) is Crawford Hall.

P.S. Free pizza!

Next Cinematheque screening:

4/11: Lauren Russell, ‘Amélie’ (2001)

Cinematheque: ‘The Seventh Continent’ (1989)

This Wednesday, 3/14, at 6:30 pm in Crawford 169 is the fifth Cinematheque screening of the semester.

Katie Bird (Ph.D. student, film studies) will present The Seventh Continent (1989), the fifth in our ‘Anthropomorphism‘ series.

About ‘The Seventh Continent’ (from ‘Netflix’):

Austrian director Michael Haneke trains a critical lens on postmodern alienation in this disquieting drama based on a true story. When young Eva Schober (Leni Tanzer) inexplicably feigns blindness at school, the incident brings to the surface the emotional fissure in her middle-class family’s humdrum existence. But as Eva and her parents (Dieter Berner and Birgit Doll) try to transcend their vacuous, pedestrian lives, the family slowly unravels.

How to get to Crawford Hall from the Cathedral of Learning:

Exit the Cathedral of Learning towards Fifth Ave. Take a right on Fifth Ave. Turn left on Tennyson Ave. (between Alumni Hall and Clapp Hall). Pass Clapp Hall and Langley Hall on your right. The building immediately after Langley Hall (and also on your right) is Crawford Hall.

P.S. Free pizza!

Next Cinematheque screening:

3/28: Jess FitzPatrick, ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’ (1988)

Cinematheque: ‘Taxidermia’ (2006)

This Wednesday, 2/29, at 6:30 pm in Crawford 169 is the fourth Cinematheque screening of the semester. Javier O’Neil-Ortiz (Ph.D. candidate, film studies) will present Taxidermia (2006), the fourth in our ‘Anthropomorphism‘ series. About ‘Taxidermia’ (from ‘Netflix’): Surreal and grotesque, this black comedy spanning three generations of men serves as an absurdist journey through the history of Hungary, from World War II through the communist era to the present. In postwar Hungary, a depraved hospital orderly spawns an outrageously obese son, Kalman (Gergely Trócsányi), who in turn goes on to raise his own progeny, a skinny boy (Marc Bischoff) freakishly obsessed with taxidermy. How to get to Crawford Hall from the Cathedral of Learning: Exit the Cathedral of Learning towards Fifth Ave. Take a right on Fifth Ave. Turn left on Tennyson Ave. (between Alumni Hall and Clapp Hall). Pass Clapp Hall and Langley Hall on your right. The building immediately after Langley Hall (and also on your right) is Crawford Hall. Next Cinematheque screening: 3/14: Katie Bird, ‘The Seventh Continent’ (1990)

Cinematheque: ‘Maximum Overdrive’ (1986) / ‘Atrocity Exhibition’ (1970)

This Wednesday, 2/15, at 6:30 pm in Crawford 169 is the third Cinematheque screening of the semester. Kevin Flanagan (Ph.D. student, film studies) will present Maximum Overdrive (1986) and Atrocity Exhibition (1986), the third in our ‘Anthropomorphism‘ series. About ‘Maximum Overdrive’ (from ‘Netflix’):

When a mysterious comet passes close to Earth, machines everywhere suddenly take on murderous minds of their own in this campy horror flick — the first and only film directed by horror mastermind Stephen King. Soon, video games, cash machines, drawbridges and steamrollers all go on a global psychotic killing spree. But when folks at the Dixie Boy Truck Stop are held hostage by a mob of homicidal 18-wheelers, human vengeance goes into overdrive.

About ‘Atrocity Exhibition’ (from ‘Rhizome’): Directed by Harely Cokliss…and features Ballard talking about some of the ideas which would coalesce into his novel ‘Crash,’ published in 1973. Intercut with footage of test motor crashes and Ballard himself are semi-dramatised scenes with actress Gabrielle Drake. Remarkably effective and disturbing. How to get to Crawford Hall from the Cathedral of Learning: Exit the Cathedral of Learning towards Fifth Ave. Take a right on Fifth Ave. Turn left on Tennyson Ave. (between Alumni Hall and Clapp Hall). Pass Clapp Hall and Langley Hall on your right. The building immediately after Langley Hall (and also on your right) is Crawford Hall. Next Cinematheque screening: 2/29: Katie Bird, ‘The Seventh Continent’ (1990)